How to transfer Bitcoin from Kraken to Binance ...

Ultimate glossary of crypto currency terms, acronyms and abbreviations

I thought it would be really cool to have an ultimate guide for those new to crypto currencies and the terms used. I made this mostly for beginner’s and veterans alike. I’m not sure how much use you will get out of this. Stuff gets lost on Reddit quite easily so I hope this finds its way to you. Included in this list, I have included most of the terms used in crypto-communities. I have compiled this list from a multitude of sources. The list is in alphabetical order and may include some words/terms not exclusive to the crypto world but may be helpful regardless.
2FA
Two factor authentication. I highly advise that you use it.
51% Attack:
A situation where a single malicious individual or group gains control of more than half of a cryptocurrency network’s computing power. Theoretically, it could allow perpetrators to manipulate the system and spend the same coin multiple times, stop other users from completing blocks and make conflicting transactions to a chain that could harm the network.
Address (or Addy):
A unique string of numbers and letters (both upper and lower case) used to send, receive or store cryptocurrency on the network. It is also the public key in a pair of keys needed to sign a digital transaction. Addresses can be shared publicly as a text or in the form of a scannable QR code. They differ between cryptocurrencies. You can’t send Bitcoin to an Ethereum address, for example.
Altcoin (alternative coin): Any digital currency other than Bitcoin. These other currencies are alternatives to Bitcoin regarding features and functionalities (e.g. faster confirmation time, lower price, improved mining algorithm, higher total coin supply). There are hundreds of altcoins, including Ether, Ripple, Litecoin and many many others.
AIRDROP:
An event where the investors/participants are able to receive free tokens or coins into their digital wallet.
AML: Defines Anti-Money Laundering laws**.**
ARBITRAGE:
Getting risk-free profits by trading (simultaneous buying and selling of the cryptocurrency) on two different exchanges which have different prices for the same asset.
Ashdraked:
Being Ashdraked is essentially a more detailed version of being Zhoutonged. It is when you lose all of your invested capital, but you do so specifically by shorting Bitcoin. The expression “Ashdraked” comes from a story of a Romanian cryptocurrency investor who insisted upon shorting BTC, as he had done so successfully in the past. When the price of BTC rose from USD 300 to USD 500, the Romanian investor lost all of his money.
ATH (All Time High):
The highest price ever achieved by a cryptocurrency in its entire history. Alternatively, ATL is all time low
Bearish:
A tendency of prices to fall; a pessimistic expectation that the value of a coin is going to drop.
Bear trap:
A manipulation of a stock or commodity by investors.
Bitcoin:
The very first, and the highest ever valued, mass-market open source and decentralized cryptocurrency and digital payment system that runs on a worldwide peer to peer network. It operates independently of any centralized authorities
Bitconnect:
One of the biggest scams in the crypto world. it was made popular in the meme world by screaming idiot Carlos Matos, who infamously proclaimed," hey hey heeeey” and “what's a what's a what's up wasssssssssuuuuuuuuuuuuup, BitConneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeect!”. He is now in the mentally ill meme hall of fame.
Block:
A package of permanently recorded data about transactions occurring every time period (typically about 10 minutes) on the blockchain network. Once a record has been completed and verified, it goes into a blockchain and gives way to the next block. Each block also contains a complex mathematical puzzle with a unique answer, without which new blocks can’t be added to the chain.
Blockchain:
An unchangeable digital record of all transactions ever made in a particular cryptocurrency and shared across thousands of computers worldwide. It has no central authority governing it. Records, or blocks, are chained to each other using a cryptographic signature. They are stored publicly and chronologically, from the genesis block to the latest block, hence the term blockchain. Anyone can have access to the database and yet it remains incredibly difficult to hack.
Bullish:
A tendency of prices to rise; an optimistic expectation that a specific cryptocurrency will do well and its value is going to increase.
BTFD:
Buy the fucking dip. This advise was bestowed upon us by the gods themselves. It is the iron code to crypto enthusiasts.
Bull market:
A market that Cryptos are going up.
Consensus:
An agreement among blockchain participants on the validity of data. Consensus is reached when the majority of nodes on the network verify that the transaction is 100% valid.
Crypto bubble:
The instability of cryptocurrencies in terms of price value
Cryptocurrency:
A type of digital currency, secured by strong computer code (cryptography), that operates independently of any middlemen or central authoritie
Cryptography:
The art of converting sensitive data into a format unreadable for unauthorized users, which when decoded would result in a meaningful statement.
Cryptojacking:
The use of someone else’s device and profiting from its computational power to mine cryptocurrency without their knowledge and consent.
Crypto-Valhalla:
When HODLers(holders) eventually cash out they go to a place called crypto-Valhalla. The strong will be separated from the weak and the strong will then be given lambos.
DAO:
Decentralized Autonomous Organizations. It defines A blockchain technology inspired organization or corporation that exists and operates without human intervention.
Dapp (decentralized application):
An open-source application that runs and stores its data on a blockchain network (instead of a central server) to prevent a single failure point. This software is not controlled by the single body – information comes from people providing other people with data or computing power.
Decentralized:
A system with no fundamental control authority that governs the network. Instead, it is jointly managed by all users to the system.
Desktop wallet:
A wallet that stores the private keys on your computer, which allow the spending and management of your bitcoins.
DILDO:
Long red or green candles. This is a crypto signal that tells you that it is not favorable to trade at the moment. Found on candlestick charts.
Digital Signature:
An encrypted digital code attached to an electronic document to prove that the sender is who they say they are and confirm that a transaction is valid and should be accepted by the network.
Double Spending:
An attack on the blockchain where a malicious user manipulates the network by sending digital money to two different recipients at exactly the same time.
DYOR:
Means do your own research.
Encryption:
Converting data into code to protect it from unauthorized access, so that only the intended recipient(s) can decode it.
Eskrow:
the practice of having a third party act as an intermediary in a transaction. This third party holds the funds on and sends them off when the transaction is completed.
Ethereum:
Ethereum is an open source, public, blockchain-based platform that runs smart contracts and allows you to build dapps on it. Ethereum is fueled by the cryptocurrency Ether.
Exchange:
A platform (centralized or decentralized) for exchanging (trading) different forms of cryptocurrencies. These exchanges allow you to exchange cryptos for local currency. Some popular exchanges are Coinbase, Bittrex, Kraken and more.
Faucet:
A website which gives away free cryptocurrencies.
Fiat money:
Fiat currency is legal tender whose value is backed by the government that issued it, such as the US dollar or UK pound.
Fork:
A split in the blockchain, resulting in two separate branches, an original and a new alternate version of the cryptocurrency. As a single blockchain forks into two, they will both run simultaneously on different parts of the network. For example, Bitcoin Cash is a Bitcoin fork.
FOMO:
Fear of missing out.
Frictionless:
A system is frictionless when there are zero transaction costs or trading retraints.
FUD:
Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt regarding the crypto market.
Gas:
A fee paid to run transactions, dapps and smart contracts on Ethereum.
Halving:
A 50% decrease in block reward after the mining of a pre-specified number of blocks. Every 4 years, the “reward” for successfully mining a block of bitcoin is reduced by half. This is referred to as “Halving”.
Hardware wallet:
Physical wallet devices that can securely store cryptocurrency maximally. Some examples are Ledger Nano S**,** Digital Bitbox and more**.**
Hash:
The process that takes input data of varying sizes, performs an operation on it and converts it into a fixed size output. It cannot be reversed.
Hashing:
The process by which you mine bitcoin or similar cryptocurrency, by trying to solve the mathematical problem within it, using cryptographic hash functions.
HODL:
A Bitcoin enthusiast once accidentally misspelled the word HOLD and it is now part of the bitcoin legend. It can also mean hold on for dear life.
ICO (Initial Coin Offering):
A blockchain-based fundraising mechanism, or a public crowd sale of a new digital coin, used to raise capital from supporters for an early stage crypto venture. Beware of these as there have been quite a few scams in the past.
John mcAfee:
A man who will one day eat his balls on live television for falsely predicting bitcoin going to 100k. He has also become a small meme within the crypto community for his outlandish claims.
JOMO:
Joy of missing out. For those who are so depressed about missing out their sadness becomes joy.
KYC:
Know your customer(alternatively consumer).
Lambo:
This stands for Lamborghini. A small meme within the investing community where the moment someone gets rich they spend their earnings on a lambo. One day we will all have lambos in crypto-valhalla.
Ledger:
Away from Blockchain, it is a book of financial transactions and balances. In the world of crypto, the blockchain functions as a ledger. A digital currency’s ledger records all transactions which took place on a certain block chain network.
Leverage:
Trading with borrowed capital (margin) in order to increase the potential return of an investment.
Liquidity:
The availability of an asset to be bought and sold easily, without affecting its market price.
of the coins.
Margin trading:
The trading of assets or securities bought with borrowed money.
Market cap/MCAP:
A short-term for Market Capitalization. Market Capitalization refers to the market value of a particular cryptocurrency. It is computed by multiplying the Price of an individual unit of coins by the total circulating supply.
Miner:
A computer participating in any cryptocurrency network performing proof of work. This is usually done to receive block rewards.
Mining:
The act of solving a complex math equation to validate a blockchain transaction using computer processing power and specialized hardware.
Mining contract:
A method of investing in bitcoin mining hardware, allowing anyone to rent out a pre-specified amount of hashing power, for an agreed amount of time. The mining service takes care of hardware maintenance, hosting and electricity costs, making it simpler for investors.
Mining rig:
A computer specially designed for mining cryptocurrencies.
Mooning:
A situation the price of a coin rapidly increases in value. Can also be used as: “I hope bitcoin goes to the moon”
Node:
Any computing device that connects to the blockchain network.
Open source:
The practice of sharing the source code for a piece of computer software, allowing it to be distributed and altered by anyone.
OTC:
Over the counter. Trading is done directly between parties.
P2P (Peer to Peer):
A type of network connection where participants interact directly with each other rather than through a centralized third party. The system allows the exchange of resources from A to B, without having to go through a separate server.
Paper wallet:
A form of “cold storage” where the private keys are printed onto a piece of paper and stored offline. Considered as one of the safest crypto wallets, the truth is that it majors in sweeping coins from your wallets.
Pre mining:
The mining of a cryptocurrency by its developers before it is released to the public.
Proof of stake (POS):
A consensus distribution algorithm which essentially rewards you based upon the amount of the coin that you own. In other words, more investment in the coin will leads to more gain when you mine with this protocol In Proof of Stake, the resource held by the “miner” is their stake in the currency.
PROOF OF WORK (POW) :
The competition of computers competing to solve a tough crypto math problem. The first computer that does this is allowed to create new blocks and record information.” The miner is then usually rewarded via transaction fees.
Protocol:
A standardized set of rules for formatting and processing data.
Public key / private key:
A cryptographic code that allows a user to receive cryptocurrencies into an account. The public key is made available to everyone via a publicly accessible directory, and the private key remains confidential to its respective owner. Because the key pair is mathematically related, whatever is encrypted with a public key may only be decrypted by its corresponding private key.
Pump and dump:
Massive buying and selling activity of cryptocurrencies (sometimes organized and to one’s benefit) which essentially result in a phenomenon where the significant surge in the value of coin followed by a huge crash take place in a short time frame.
Recovery phrase:
A set of phrases you are given whereby you can regain or access your wallet should you lose the private key to your wallets — paper, mobile, desktop, and hardware wallet. These phrases are some random 12–24 words. A recovery Phrase can also be called as Recovery seed, Seed Key, Recovery Key, or Seed Phrase.
REKT:
Referring to the word “wrecked”. It defines a situation whereby an investor or trader who has been ruined utterly following the massive losses suffered in crypto industry.
Ripple:
An alternative payment network to Bitcoin based on similar cryptography. The ripple network uses XRP as currency and is capable of sending any asset type.
ROI:
Return on investment.
Safu:
A crypto term for safe popularized by the Bizonnaci YouTube channel after the CEO of Binance tweeted
“Funds are safe."
“the exchage I use got hacked!”“Oh no, are your funds safu?”
“My coins better be safu!”


Sats/Satoshi:
The smallest fraction of a bitcoin is called a “satoshi” or “sat”. It represents one hundred-millionth of a bitcoin and is named after Satoshi Nakamoto.
Satoshi Nakamoto:
This was the pseudonym for the mysterious creator of Bitcoin.
Scalability:
The ability of a cryptocurrency to contain the massive use of its Blockchain.
Sharding:
A scaling solution for the Blockchain. It is generally a method that allows nodes to have partial copies of the complete blockchain in order to increase overall network performance and consensus speeds.
Shitcoin:
Coin with little potential or future prospects.
Shill:
Spreading buzz by heavily promoting a particular coin in the community to create awareness.
Short position:
Selling of a specific cryptocurrency with an expectation that it will drop in value.
Silk road:
The online marketplace where drugs and other illicit items were traded for Bitcoin. This marketplace is using accessed through “TOR”, and VPNs. In October 2013, a Silk Road was shut down in by the FBI.
Smart Contract:
Certain computational benchmarks or barriers that have to be met in turn for money or data to be deposited or even be used to verify things such as land rights.
Software Wallet:
A crypto wallet that exists purely as software files on a computer. Usually, software wallets can be generated for free from a variety of sources.
Solidity:
A contract-oriented coding language for implementing smart contracts on Ethereum. Its syntax is similar to that of JavaScript.
Stable coin:
A cryptocoin with an extremely low volatility that can be used to trade against the overall market.
Staking:
Staking is the process of actively participating in transaction validation (similar to mining) on a proof-of-stake (PoS) blockchain. On these blockchains, anyone with a minimum-required balance of a specific cryptocurrency can validate transactions and earn Staking rewards.
Surge:
When a crypto currency appreciates or goes up in price.
Tank:
The opposite of mooning. When a coin tanks it can also be described as crashing.
Tendies
For traders , the chief prize is “tendies” (chicken tenders, the treat an overgrown man-child receives for being a “Good Boy”) .
Token:
A unit of value that represents a digital asset built on a blockchain system. A token is usually considered as a “coin” of a cryptocurrency, but it really has a wider functionality.
TOR: “The Onion Router” is a free web browser designed to protect users’ anonymity and resist censorship. Tor is usually used surfing the web anonymously and access sites on the “Darkweb”.
Transaction fee:
An amount of money users are charged from their transaction when sending cryptocurrencies.
Volatility:
A measure of fluctuations in the price of a financial instrument over time. High volatility in bitcoin is seen as risky since its shifting value discourages people from spending or accepting it.
Wallet:
A file that stores all your private keys and communicates with the blockchain to perform transactions. It allows you to send and receive bitcoins securely as well as view your balance and transaction history.
Whale:
An investor that holds a tremendous amount of cryptocurrency. Their extraordinary large holdings allow them to control prices and manipulate the market.
Whitepaper:

A comprehensive report or guide made to understand an issue or help decision making. It is also seen as a technical write up that most cryptocurrencies provide to take a deep look into the structure and plan of the cryptocurrency/Blockchain project. Satoshi Nakamoto was the first to release a whitepaper on Bitcoin, titled “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System” in late 2008.
And with that I finally complete my odyssey. I sincerely hope that this helped you and if you are new, I welcome you to crypto. If you read all of that I hope it increased, you in knowledge.
my final definition:
Crypto-Family:
A collection of all the HODLers and crypto fanatics. A place where all people alike unite over a love for crypto.
We are all in this together as we pioneer the new world that is crypto currency. I wish you a great day and Happy HODLing.
-u/flacciduck
feel free to comment words or terms that you feel should be included or about any errors I made.
Edit1:some fixes were made and added words.
submitted by flacciduck to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Trade Nano for Bitcoin, HELP?

So I came into some NANO and I wanted to trade it for Bitcoin. I was going to use uniswap but I can not, for the life of me, find the address for NANO. I found multiple "nano" on etherscan but I don't want to copy the wrong address (they all seem like the wrong one)
So it seems like Uniswap is out of the question. Unless someone can help me find the token address for NANO.
KuCoin: Has deposit and withdraw disabled at the moment.
Kraken: Won't verify outside the US. I can deposit but can't withdraw.
Binance.US: Only has USD pair and I'm having trouble with Verifying. Therefore it won't let me trade to USD.
The goal is to turn NANO into BTC with the least amount steps as possible. Advice is appreciated. Please and Thank You.
submitted by KreaytivUzrnaym to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

What Exchange for traders in US of A?

Hi All,
What exchange are you using to trade your TRX coins?
In the past I've used Binance but no longer able to use that. I tried Kraken and KuCoin. I don't see Tron under Kraken and KuCoin is not allowing deposits or withdrawals.
I'm located in USA. I just want to trade for Bitcoin and send back to Coinbase.
Please help. TYIA
submitted by SkepticalDreams to Tronix [link] [comments]

Want to buy Bitcoin? Fees matter. Here's a survey of fees charged by top U.S. exchanges.

I've seen a lot of questions lately from folks asking where they should buy bitcoin. In my opinion, two things matter in answering this question, security and the fees (deposit, trading, withdrawal, etc.) charged by the exchange. Here's a brief sample of fees charged by some of the most secure U.S. exchanges:
Exchange Fees ((MakeTaker) / Withdrawal):
Binance - 0.10%(M&T) / 0.0005 BTC
Kraken - 0.16%(M) / 0.26%(T) / 0.0005 BTC
Gemini Active Trader - 0.25%(M) / 0.35%(T) / Free (if 10 or less per month)
Coinbase Pro - 0.50%(M&T) / **Variable
I personally use Gemini since I only trade in bitcoin and ether, and if that also describes you I would recommend them since there are no withdrawal fees, unlike Binance, Kraken, and now Coinbase**.
Anyone have any comparable (or better) options that they've used?
Edit: I do not personally use or endorse exchanges like RobinHood where you do not actually own the bitcoin you purchase.
**Edit: 9/17/20 - Coinbase Pro just announced it will now charge variable fees on all withdrawal transactions. Smh. Coinbase will never learn.
submitted by ChallengerDeep to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Nano will be listed on Kraken on November 6

submitted by mushhhhh to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

Start with BTC trading

I have asked this first on BitcoinBeginners and Bitcoin but my question was not well received there. I'll try my luck here.
I would like to start trading BTC on Blade which, as many of you may know, currently offers zero-fee crypto trading.
I have learned quite a bit about bitcoins and the block-chain technology, followed the market and designed a trading strategy in the past. Due to the high trading fees and 2018 bubble burst I was reluctant to start trading.
To do that, here are the steps I understand I need to follow:
  1. Find an exchange in order to buy BTC with fiat money.
  2. Find a wallet where to store the acquired bitcoins.
  3. Deposit BTC to blade.
Questions:
(1) Which exchange would you recommend? My main (ordered) criteria are:
I'm currently considering Kraken and Binance. BitSquare was another option, but apparently it requires one to transfer BTC upfront in order to be able to buy BTC.
(2) Something I don't understand at the moment: why do I have to use a wallet for my BTC, aren't they securely stored with the exchange where I buy them?
(3) Besides Blade I have also heard that Digitex, Amplify, Shapeshift offer comission-free trading. Which would you recommend?
submitted by orso-nero to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Hướng dẫn cách mua tiền ảo Ripple bằng các hình thức khác nhau

Hướng dẫn cách mua tiền ảo Ripple bằng các hình thức khác nhau
Có vẻ như mọi người đang đổ xô nhảy vào đầu tư tiền điện tử trong những năm gần lại đây. Trong đó Ripple (XRP) đang nhanh chóng trở thành một trong những đồng tiền thay thế hot nhất trên thị trường. Cách mua tiền ảo Ripple nhưu thế nào? Và mua ở đâu? Bài viết hôm nay chúng ta sẽ cùng nhau bàn về vấn đề này.

Mua tiền ảo Ripple ở đâu?


https://preview.redd.it/hhp7yvxcwrx51.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=cbc29cb378e441592c4eedb630f7b7622c565fe5
Mua tiền ảo Ripple ở đâu?
Bước thiết yếu đầu tiên khi mua Ripple là bạn phải biết mua Ripple ở đâu. Không phải mọi sàn giao dịch tiền ảo đều có Ripple, nhưng có một danh sách khổng lồ các sàn giao dịch được đề xuất để mà bạn có thể chọn lựa.

Ví Ripple

Ví tiền ảo là nơi lưu trữ, gửi hoặc nhận tiền điện tử kỹ thuật số thông qua việc có một khóa đặc biệt. Ví tiền điện tử có thể là ví vật lý hoặc ví trực tuyến và thường cung cấp dịch vụ trao đổi ngoài việc lưu trữ. Một số ví Ripple bao gồm Leger Nano S – một lựa chọn hấp dẫn đối với nhiều người do hình thức vật lý của nó (nó trông giống như một thẻ USB). Một lựa chọn phổ biến khác là Toast Wallet, một ví trực tuyến miễn phí hỗ trợ XRP. Nó là một ví mã nguồn mở có thể chứa Windows, Android và iOS. Abra Wallet là một lựa chọn khác cho ví trực tuyến cung cấp cả dịch vụ ví và trao đổi. Tuy nhiên, độ tin cậy của nó có phần không chắc chắn, vì vậy hãy cẩn thận khi chọn ví tiền ảo.

Sàn giao dịch Ripple

Sàn giao dịch tiền điện tử về cơ bản là nơi mọi người có thể chuyển và trao đổi các loại tiền tệ khác nhau (có thể là tiền điện tử hoặc đô la). Điều này thường có thể được thực hiện bằng cách chuyển một loại tiền tệ như USD hoặc Euro thành tiền điện tử như Bitcoin hoặc Ripple và ngược lại. Có một số sàn giao dịch khác nhau mà Ripple sử dụng và được đề xuất.
Một số trong số những cái được đề xuất nhiều nhất là Binance và Bitsane, nhưng trang web Ripple cũng khuyến nghị Bitstamp, Kraken và thêm một số sàn giao dịch khác. Một số sàn giao dịch này không thể chuyển USD thành XRP (Ripple token), nhưng một số thì có. Trước khi chọn sử dụng, hãy đảm bảo rằng bạn biết tùy chọn nào phù hợp nhất với mình và liệu bạn muốn chuyển trực tiếp từ USD hay sử dụng phương pháp khác như chuyển từ một loại tiền điện tử khác (như Bitcoin hoặc Ethereum) sang XRP.

Cách mua tiền ảo Ripple


https://preview.redd.it/x7e9uxqdwrx51.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=3cb44d63fcef45fd5e9aca8eb3bd140739b329cb
Cách mua tiền ảo Ripple
Có hai cách chính để mua Ripple – trực tiếp (sử dụng thẻ tín dụng / thẻ ghi nợ hoặc ngân hàng) hoặc thông qua sàn giao dịch. Mặc dù mua Ripple trực tiếp bằng USD là cách dễ nhất, nhưng không phải tất cả các sàn giao dịch đều có khả năng này. Ngoài ra, tỷ giá hối đoái thường không được tốt bằng cách mua một loại tiền điện tử khác trước (như Ether), sau đó bạn có thể mua Ripple trong một sàn giao dịch.

Cách mua tiền ảo Ripple bằng Coinbase và Binance

Có một số sàn giao dịch khác nhau để mua Ripple. Ví dụ sử dụng sàn tiền ảo tốt nhất – Binance. Như thường lệ với nhiều sàn giao dịch, bạn không thể mua Ripple trực tiếp trên Binance bằng USD, vì vậy trước tiên bạn sẽ phải mua một đồng tiền khác như Bitcoin hoặc Ethereum và chuyển chúng sang Binance.. Để mua Ripple bằng Coinbase và Binance, bạn cần phải:
  • Tạo tài khoản trên trang Binance. Điều này sẽ bao gồm việc tạo mật khẩu và nhập email của bạn vào – những thông tin cơ bản nhất.
  • Chuyển Bitcoin (hoặc tiền điện tử khác như Ethereum hoặc litcoin) vào tài khoản Binance của mình. Bạn có thể thực hiện việc này bằng cách cuộn qua nút “funds” trên đầu màn hình và nhấp vào “deposit withdrawals”.
  • Nhấp vào đồng tiền bạn muốn trao đổi ví dụ như Bitcoin (BTC) và chọn nút “deposit”. Sau đó sao chép địa chỉ BTC được cung cấp.
Sau đó, đăng nhập vào sàn giao dịch bạn sử dụng để mua Bitcoin – Coinbase và chuyển đến “accounts”. Bạn có thể mua Bitcoin trên Coinbase bằng tài khoản ngân hàng được liên kết hoặc thẻ ghi nợ.
  • Chuyển đến ví BTC của bạn ở phía bên trái của trang và nhấp vào “send” BTC. Thường có một khoản phí nhỏ.
  • Dán địa chỉ Bitcoin mà bạn đã sử dụng trên Binance vào ô “recipient” và nhập số tiền bạn muốn chuyển.
  • Đăng nhập lại vào Binance và trong phần “funds”, chuyển đến “deposit withdrawals” và kiểm tra “total balance” – bạn sẽ thấy Bitcoin mà bạn đã chuyển.
  • Để trao đổi Bitcoin của bạn thành Ripple (XRP), hãy nhấp vào nút “exchange” trên đầu trang và nhấp vào “Basic”.
  • Tìm kiếm “XRP” trong hộp tìm kiếm và chọn từ BTC (vì vậy nó sẽ là “XRP / BTC”). Nhấp vào số lượng Bitcoin mà bạn muốn chuyển sang Ripple (bạn có các tùy chọn bao gồm 25%, 50%, 75% hoặc 100% BTC của mình).
  • Chọn số tiền bạn muốn và nhấp vào “Buy XRP.” Việc chuyển tiền sẽ được thực hiện nhanh chóng, vì vậy khi bạn đã mua Ripple, hãy kiểm tra lại tiền của mình và bạn sẽ thấy XRP trong tổng số dư của mình.

Cách mua tiền ảo Ripple bằng USD

Theo trang web Ripple, bạn có thể mua Ripple trực tiếp bằng tiền mặt của mình (cho dù đó là USD, EUR hay loại khác) thông qua tài khoản ngân hàng hoặc thẻ tín dụng của bạn. Để bắt đầu bán sẽ thực hiện các bước như sau:
  • Tạo tài khoản trên Bitstamp và nhập thông tin cần thiết – tên người dùng và mật khẩu sẽ được gửi đến email của bạn.
  • Đăng nhập vào tài khoản của bạn bằng tên người dùng và mật khẩu được cung cấp, sau đó thay đổi ngay mật khẩu của bạn khi được nhắc. Bạn cũng có thể bật chế độ xác thực hai yếu tố.
  • Xác minh tài khoản của bạn bằng cách điền vào thông tin được nhắc ở cửa sổ. Bạn có thể tải lên các tài liệu phù hợp với yêu cầu. Nhấn “submit verification request”.
  • Sau khi được xác minh, hãy chuyển đến tài khoản của bạn và nhấp vào nút “deposit”, tại đây bạn sẽ có thể chọn phương thức chuyển khoản ngân hàng bạn muốn sử dụng ở phía bên trái.
  • Chọn “international wire transfer” và điền bất kỳ thông tin nào cần thiết.
  • Sử dụng chi tiết ngân hàng của Bitstamp để chuyển tiền từ tài khoản ngân hàng bạn có sang Bitstamp. Khi tiền của bạn đã chuyển thành công sang Bitstamp, hãy nhấp vào thị trường bạn muốn trao đổi (để mua Ripple bằng tiền mặt, hãy nhấp vào thị trường XRP / USD).
  • Chuyển đến phần “buy/sell” và nhấp vào “Buy XRP” trong “instant order (simple” Nhập số tiền bạn muốn mua vào hộp “I want to spend” và nhấp vào “Buy XRP”.
XRP sẽ được thêm vào tổng số dư trong tài khoản Bitstamp của bạn. Mặc dù các thủ tục sẽ khác một chút tùy thuộc vào sàn giao dịch bạn sử dụng, nhưng hầu hết đều khá dễ hiểu để sử dụng. Hãy chắc chắn việc nghiên cứu trước khi sử dụng bất kỳ sàn giao dịch nào để tránh bất kỳ trang web bất chính nào. Nhiều người cũng đã sử dụng PayPal như một cách để mua Bitcoin.

Lời kết

Ripple là một giải pháp thay thế cho Bitcoin, Ethereum và Litecoin. Khác với hầu hết các loại tiền điện tử thì Ripple thực sự sử dụng kết nối với các ngân hàng và công ty. Việc trao đổi token của Ripple đã nhanh chóng trở nên phổ biến do nó được cho là có thời gian chuyển giao rất ngắn trong các sàn giao dịch và phí thấp. Vì vậy nếu muốn mua tiền ảo Ripple bạn có thể tham khảo cách cách mua tiền ảo Ripple trên đây.Xem thêm: Cách mua tiền ảo Bitcoin từ A đến Z cho người mới tham gia
submitted by san_giao_dich_tienao to u/san_giao_dich_tienao [link] [comments]

Bob The Magic Custodian



Summary: Everyone knows that when you give your assets to someone else, they always keep them safe. If this is true for individuals, it is certainly true for businesses.
Custodians always tell the truth and manage funds properly. They won't have any interest in taking the assets as an exchange operator would. Auditors tell the truth and can't be misled. That's because organizations that are regulated are incapable of lying and don't make mistakes.

First, some background. Here is a summary of how custodians make us more secure:

Previously, we might give Alice our crypto assets to hold. There were risks:

But "no worries", Alice has a custodian named Bob. Bob is dressed in a nice suit. He knows some politicians. And he drives a Porsche. "So you have nothing to worry about!". And look at all the benefits we get:
See - all problems are solved! All we have to worry about now is:
It's pretty simple. Before we had to trust Alice. Now we only have to trust Alice, Bob, and all the ways in which they communicate. Just think of how much more secure we are!

"On top of that", Bob assures us, "we're using a special wallet structure". Bob shows Alice a diagram. "We've broken the balance up and store it in lots of smaller wallets. That way", he assures her, "a thief can't take it all at once". And he points to a historic case where a large sum was taken "because it was stored in a single wallet... how stupid".
"Very early on, we used to have all the crypto in one wallet", he said, "and then one Christmas a hacker came and took it all. We call him the Grinch. Now we individually wrap each crypto and stick it under a binary search tree. The Grinch has never been back since."

"As well", Bob continues, "even if someone were to get in, we've got insurance. It covers all thefts and even coercion, collusion, and misplaced keys - only subject to the policy terms and conditions." And with that, he pulls out a phone-book sized contract and slams it on the desk with a thud. "Yep", he continues, "we're paying top dollar for one of the best policies in the country!"
"Can I read it?' Alice asks. "Sure," Bob says, "just as soon as our legal team is done with it. They're almost through the first chapter." He pauses, then continues. "And can you believe that sales guy Mike? He has the same year Porsche as me. I mean, what are the odds?"

"Do you use multi-sig?", Alice asks. "Absolutely!" Bob replies. "All our engineers are fully trained in multi-sig. Whenever we want to set up a new wallet, we generate 2 separate keys in an air-gapped process and store them in this proprietary system here. Look, it even requires the biometric signature from one of our team members to initiate any withdrawal." He demonstrates by pressing his thumb into the display. "We use a third-party cloud validation API to match the thumbprint and authorize each withdrawal. The keys are also backed up daily to an off-site third-party."
"Wow that's really impressive," Alice says, "but what if we need access for a withdrawal outside of office hours?" "Well that's no issue", Bob says, "just send us an email, call, or text message and we always have someone on staff to help out. Just another part of our strong commitment to all our customers!"

"What about Proof of Reserve?", Alice asks. "Of course", Bob replies, "though rather than publish any blockchain addresses or signed transaction, for privacy we just do a SHA256 refactoring of the inverse hash modulus for each UTXO nonce and combine the smart contract coefficient consensus in our hyperledger lightning node. But it's really simple to use." He pushes a button and a large green checkmark appears on a screen. "See - the algorithm ran through and reserves are proven."
"Wow", Alice says, "you really know your stuff! And that is easy to use! What about fiat balances?" "Yeah, we have an auditor too", Bob replies, "Been using him for a long time so we have quite a strong relationship going! We have special books we give him every year and he's very efficient! Checks the fiat, crypto, and everything all at once!"

"We used to have a nice offline multi-sig setup we've been using without issue for the past 5 years, but I think we'll move all our funds over to your facility," Alice says. "Awesome", Bob replies, "Thanks so much! This is perfect timing too - my Porsche got a dent on it this morning. We have the paperwork right over here." "Great!", Alice replies.
And with that, Alice gets out her pen and Bob gets the contract. "Don't worry", he says, "you can take your crypto-assets back anytime you like - just subject to our cancellation policy. Our annual management fees are also super low and we don't adjust them often".

How many holes have to exist for your funds to get stolen?
Just one.

Why are we taking a powerful offline multi-sig setup, widely used globally in hundreds of different/lacking regulatory environments with 0 breaches to date, and circumventing it by a demonstrably weak third party layer? And paying a great expense to do so?
If you go through the list of breaches in the past 2 years to highly credible organizations, you go through the list of major corporate frauds (only the ones we know about), you go through the list of all the times platforms have lost funds, you go through the list of times and ways that people have lost their crypto from identity theft, hot wallet exploits, extortion, etc... and then you go through this custodian with a fine-tooth comb and truly believe they have value to add far beyond what you could, sticking your funds in a wallet (or set of wallets) they control exclusively is the absolute worst possible way to take advantage of that security.

The best way to add security for crypto-assets is to make a stronger multi-sig. With one custodian, what you are doing is giving them your cryptocurrency and hoping they're honest, competent, and flawlessly secure. It's no different than storing it on a really secure exchange. Maybe the insurance will cover you. Didn't work for Bitpay in 2015. Didn't work for Yapizon in 2017. Insurance has never paid a claim in the entire history of cryptocurrency. But maybe you'll get lucky. Maybe your exact scenario will buck the trend and be what they're willing to cover. After the large deductible and hopefully without a long and expensive court battle.

And you want to advertise this increase in risk, the lapse of judgement, an accident waiting to happen, as though it's some kind of benefit to customers ("Free institutional-grade storage for your digital assets.")? And then some people are writing to the OSC that custodians should be mandatory for all funds on every exchange platform? That this somehow will make Canadians as a whole more secure or better protected compared with standard air-gapped multi-sig? On what planet?

Most of the problems in Canada stemmed from one thing - a lack of transparency. If Canadians had known what a joke Quadriga was - it wouldn't have grown to lose $400m from hard-working Canadians from coast to coast to coast. And Gerald Cotten would be in jail, not wherever he is now (at best, rotting peacefully). EZ-BTC and mister Dave Smilie would have been a tiny little scam to his friends, not a multi-million dollar fraud. Einstein would have got their act together or been shut down BEFORE losing millions and millions more in people's funds generously donated to criminals. MapleChange wouldn't have even been a thing. And maybe we'd know a little more about CoinTradeNewNote - like how much was lost in there. Almost all of the major losses with cryptocurrency exchanges involve deception with unbacked funds.
So it's great to see transparency reports from BitBuy and ShakePay where someone independently verified the backing. The only thing we don't have is:
It's not complicated to validate cryptocurrency assets. They need to exist, they need to be spendable, and they need to cover the total balances. There are plenty of credible people and firms across the country that have the capacity to reasonably perform this validation. Having more frequent checks by different, independent, parties who publish transparent reports is far more valuable than an annual check by a single "more credible/official" party who does the exact same basic checks and may or may not publish anything. Here's an example set of requirements that could be mandated:
There are ways to structure audits such that neither crypto assets nor customer information are ever put at risk, and both can still be properly validated and publicly verifiable. There are also ways to structure audits such that they are completely reasonable for small platforms and don't inhibit innovation in any way. By making the process as reasonable as possible, we can completely eliminate any reason/excuse that an honest platform would have for not being audited. That is arguable far more important than any incremental improvement we might get from mandating "the best of the best" accountants. Right now we have nothing mandated and tons of Canadians using offshore exchanges with no oversight whatsoever.

Transparency does not prove crypto assets are safe. CoinTradeNewNote, Flexcoin ($600k), and Canadian Bitcoins ($100k) are examples where crypto-assets were breached from platforms in Canada. All of them were online wallets and used no multi-sig as far as any records show. This is consistent with what we see globally - air-gapped multi-sig wallets have an impeccable record, while other schemes tend to suffer breach after breach. We don't actually know how much CoinTrader lost because there was no visibility. Rather than publishing details of what happened, the co-founder of CoinTrader silently moved on to found another platform - the "most trusted way to buy and sell crypto" - a site that has no information whatsoever (that I could find) on the storage practices and a FAQ advising that “[t]rading cryptocurrency is completely safe” and that having your own wallet is “entirely up to you! You can certainly keep cryptocurrency, or fiat, or both, on the app.” Doesn't sound like much was learned here, which is really sad to see.
It's not that complicated or unreasonable to set up a proper hardware wallet. Multi-sig can be learned in a single course. Something the equivalent complexity of a driver's license test could prevent all the cold storage exploits we've seen to date - even globally. Platform operators have a key advantage in detecting and preventing fraud - they know their customers far better than any custodian ever would. The best job that custodians can do is to find high integrity individuals and train them to form even better wallet signatories. Rather than mandating that all platforms expose themselves to arbitrary third party risks, regulations should center around ensuring that all signatories are background-checked, properly trained, and using proper procedures. We also need to make sure that signatories are empowered with rights and responsibilities to reject and report fraud. They need to know that they can safely challenge and delay a transaction - even if it turns out they made a mistake. We need to have an environment where mistakes are brought to the surface and dealt with. Not one where firms and people feel the need to hide what happened. In addition to a knowledge-based test, an auditor can privately interview each signatory to make sure they're not in coercive situations, and we should make sure they can freely and anonymously report any issues without threat of retaliation.
A proper multi-sig has each signature held by a separate person and is governed by policies and mutual decisions instead of a hierarchy. It includes at least one redundant signature. For best results, 3of4, 3of5, 3of6, 4of5, 4of6, 4of7, 5of6, or 5of7.

History has demonstrated over and over again the risk of hot wallets even to highly credible organizations. Nonetheless, many platforms have hot wallets for convenience. While such losses are generally compensated by platforms without issue (for example Poloniex, Bitstamp, Bitfinex, Gatecoin, Coincheck, Bithumb, Zaif, CoinBene, Binance, Bitrue, Bitpoint, Upbit, VinDAX, and now KuCoin), the public tends to focus more on cases that didn't end well. Regardless of what systems are employed, there is always some level of risk. For that reason, most members of the public would prefer to see third party insurance.
Rather than trying to convince third party profit-seekers to provide comprehensive insurance and then relying on an expensive and slow legal system to enforce against whatever legal loopholes they manage to find each and every time something goes wrong, insurance could be run through multiple exchange operators and regulators, with the shared interest of having a reputable industry, keeping costs down, and taking care of Canadians. For example, a 4 of 7 multi-sig insurance fund held between 5 independent exchange operators and 2 regulatory bodies. All Canadian exchanges could pay premiums at a set rate based on their needed coverage, with a higher price paid for hot wallet coverage (anything not an air-gapped multi-sig cold wallet). Such a model would be much cheaper to manage, offer better coverage, and be much more reliable to payout when needed. The kind of coverage you could have under this model is unheard of. You could even create something like the CDIC to protect Canadians who get their trading accounts hacked if they can sufficiently prove the loss is legitimate. In cases of fraud, gross negligence, or insolvency, the fund can be used to pay affected users directly (utilizing the last transparent balance report in the worst case), something which private insurance would never touch. While it's recommended to have official policies for coverage, a model where members vote would fully cover edge cases. (Could be similar to the Supreme Court where justices vote based on case law.)
Such a model could fully protect all Canadians across all platforms. You can have a fiat coverage governed by legal agreements, and crypto-asset coverage governed by both multi-sig and legal agreements. It could be practical, affordable, and inclusive.

Now, we are at a crossroads. We can happily give up our freedom, our innovation, and our money. We can pay hefty expenses to auditors, lawyers, and regulators year after year (and make no mistake - this cost will grow to many millions or even billions as the industry grows - and it will be borne by all Canadians on every platform because platforms are not going to eat up these costs at a loss). We can make it nearly impossible for any new platform to enter the marketplace, forcing Canadians to use the same stagnant platforms year after year. We can centralize and consolidate the entire industry into 2 or 3 big players and have everyone else fail (possibly to heavy losses of users of those platforms). And when a flawed security model doesn't work and gets breached, we can make it even more complicated with even more people in suits making big money doing the job that blockchain was supposed to do in the first place. We can build a system which is so intertwined and dependent on big government, traditional finance, and central bankers that it's future depends entirely on that of the fiat system, of fractional banking, and of government bail-outs. If we choose this path, as history has shown us over and over again, we can not go back, save for revolution. Our children and grandchildren will still be paying the consequences of what we decided today.
Or, we can find solutions that work. We can maintain an open and innovative environment while making the adjustments we need to make to fully protect Canadian investors and cryptocurrency users, giving easy and affordable access to cryptocurrency for all Canadians on the platform of their choice, and creating an environment in which entrepreneurs and problem solvers can bring those solutions forward easily. None of the above precludes innovation in any way, or adds any unreasonable cost - and these three policies would demonstrably eliminate or resolve all 109 historic cases as studied here - that's every single case researched so far going back to 2011. It includes every loss that was studied so far not just in Canada but globally as well.
Unfortunately, finding answers is the least challenging part. Far more challenging is to get platform operators and regulators to agree on anything. My last post got no response whatsoever, and while the OSC has told me they're happy for industry feedback, I believe my opinion alone is fairly meaningless. This takes the whole community working together to solve. So please let me know your thoughts. Please take the time to upvote and share this with people. Please - let's get this solved and not leave it up to other people to do.

Facts/background/sources (skip if you like):



Thoughts?
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

TkeyNet: What’s new?

TkeyNet: What’s new?

https://i.redd.it/zyuf3vxvvdp51.gif
“The TkeyNet development team is surprising to us” — recently such a quote came from our lips. Why would that be?

TkeyNet: Instant transactions

Now transactions in the TkeyNet network are instant. You won’t even notice how the TKEY delivers to the recipient. For example, when you send a payment from card to card, and after a few seconds, the money is in the recipient’s possession. Despite the fast speed of transactions, the system has not only preserved its security properties but also strengthened them and still works on the blockchain.
“The chain of information a store on every computer in the network. The addition of information occurs by using cryptographic functions, allowing you to identify the information for any period. When a new data block adds to the TkeyNet network, the integrity of all previous information confirm by the entire TkeyNet, and each node checks its integrity.”

Financial marketplace


https://preview.redd.it/4j6y85zxvdp51.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=1ef221053e4e90b08a9f67e6eef220b74bc94b0f
In early September, we completed work on one of the main functions of the system: “The Financial Module Of The Marketplace.”

What is it for, and how does the “Financial Marketplace module” work?

TkeyNet combines various assets in a single system, creating instant access to liquidity. Digital exchanges connect to TkeyNet and provide assets for exchange: BTC, USDT, ETH, and others. For example, Kraken connects to TkeyNet and provides digital assets: ETH, ETC. Binance: USD, BTC. Bitfinex: USDT, EOS, etc. Exchanges can provide any assets that trade on their platforms.
The blockchain acts as a Registrar of financial transactions. Accounts, balances, and orders store in a distributed registry TkeyNet, and copies of data to distribute across network TkeyNet nodes. Payment routing is implemented in the TkeyNet system, which allows you to track not only balances but also distribute transactions without the participation of any party.
The user, in turn, has quick access to transactions with digital currencies, regardless of the blockchain used: Bitcoin, Ethereum, EOS, or any other, transactions are recorded in TkeyNet, and transactions are processed instantly.
“The task of the platform is to automate the interaction of the parties and ensure the convenience of performing operations. — This is the core element of a trusted environment.”
In addition to digital assets, the “Financial Marketplace module” includes working with Fiat currencies, stocks, bonds, as well as raw materials: oil, gas, diamonds, etc. — This means that payment systems, banks, currency exchanges, commodity exchanges, and other financial market participants, are also connected to the TkeyNet blockchain.

Payments between companies in a few seconds

https://preview.redd.it/v84fizszvdp51.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=e501b06661b2a960fe75abe07a1aba5177db620d
Companies can make payments in seconds, not days. TkeyNet can seriously mitigate the adverse risks of extraterritorial sanctions against the financial system of the countries if such follow. Also, the ability to conduct internal and cross-border transfers through an independent financial channel directly to the counterparty at high-speed is beneficial to business and the state from any point of view.
Each user will be able to make quick transfers to counterparty wallets, exchange digital currency for another or fiat money at the current exchange rate.

What else is interesting? — Applications

Developers can connect to TkeyNet and get access to a large-scale pool of liquidity: digital currencies, stocks, precious metals, etc.
This solution not only reduces development costs but also allows you to get access to the best prices and fast exchanges. You can create any financial application, regardless of the market usage: a cryptocurrency, or financial markets.
Developers can create a digital Bank or exchange, fast connect the app, and TkeyNet using the API.
“By working with partners around the world, we can significantly increase our market share in this business, providing our partners with ready-made tools without risks.”
And also regardless of the applications that will be created by partner developers. The company will provide its interfaces that will provide access to various types of assets — digital currencies: BTC, USDT, ETH, etc.; Fiat currencies: euros, dollars, pounds, etc.; securities and commodity assets.

https://preview.redd.it/23whmnm1wdp51.png?width=679&format=png&auto=webp&s=52bf10bf43268f835cff981a110d41528b838a89
Anywhere in the world, at any time, the system user will have access to the desired currency without having to exchange one for another. Also, when implementing the application for NFC payments, it will become even easier to use the system. However, even with the availability of several types of currencies, such as the pound, dollar, and euro, it is easy to make payments abroad.
“According to the World Bank, more than 1.7 billion adults are still not covered by banking services, but two-thirds of them have a mobile phone that can help them access financial services. — This tells us one thing: the traditional banking approach is exceptionally inefficient. Lack of infrastructure: a network of ATMs, fees and deposits, a network of cashiers, and internal money transfer programs are just some named obstacles to creating a real banking experience.”
Imagine that in one app you have access to Apple shares, Tesla shares, gold, precious metals, rubles, dollars, and even oil if you want. TkeyNet — makes this possible.
TkeyNet is an industrial solution designed for companies and users at the same time. Since payments in the system are very fast, a person can store and send money in any asset they want. This flexibility creates an open market, which is necessary at present.

Postscript

TkeyNet back-end — completed. Currently, we are actively working on the front-end side. Regardless of working on the front-end side, the TkeyNet system is tested on an ongoing basis.
submitted by tkeycoin to Tkeycoin_Official [link] [comments]

Are these the right/best steps to getting ready to stake?

Hi, I own a small amount of Cardano on eToro, but would like to buy a larger amount to be able to stake. I know there is a lot of info within posts here, but it can be a little overwhelming for people new to this. So I have worked out what I think I need to do and have written a checklist below. I was hoping just to get someone to tell me if the steps are correct and my assumptions are right? Also any recommendations on different steps/changes/wallets is welcome. Thanks
I am in the UK so currency I use is GBP
  1. Deposit funds from Bank to Currency Exchange - Kraken. Fee is charged. It seems to me that Kraken's fees (overall, including fees further down list) are lower than Binance, but neither take money deposits without a charge unless you use Etana, but Etana taking a long time to verify my account and seem to have tech issues at the mo
  2. Neither Kraken or Binance have GB /ADA pair so I need to purchase a crypto that does, such as Bitcoin. I believe this is a cheaper way than buying in USD for example. Fees/spread apply to this purchase
  3. Buy ADA using Bitcoin. Fees/spread apply to this purchase
  4. Transfer ADA to Daedalus wallet. Fees apply. I have installed Daedalus
  5. Wait until (some date in near future) then Opt into a stake pool (I will read how to do that later)
  6. If I want to sell Cardano in the future I will need to transfer back to an Exchange wallet and sell for GBP, again with all fees associated with that.
Does this look good? There are quite a few fees along the way, I hope they don't add up to too much.
Thanks
EDIT: Thanks for the help, I have manged to buy some Cardano!! I did a bank transfer to Kraken, which I was then a little worried about as it said it could take 3 days, but it arrived withing 30 minutes. I then purchased Bitcoin (which was hard work for a noob!) and then used that to buy Cardano. I can't transfer to Daedalus as there is a 72 hour lock on withdrawals!
submitted by silvercue to cardano [link] [comments]

How To End The Cryptocurrency Exchange "Wild West" Without Crippling Innovation


In case you haven't noticed the consultation paper, staff notice, and report on Quadriga, regulators are now clamping down on Canadian cryptocurrency exchanges. The OSC and other regulatory bodies are still interested in industry feedback. They have not put forward any official regulation yet. Below are some ideas/insights and a proposed framework.



Many of you have limited time to read the full proposal, so here are the highlights:

Offline Multi-Signature

Effective standards to prevent both internal and external theft. Exchange operators are trained and certified, and have a legal responsibility to users.

Regular Transparent Audits

Provides visibility to Canadians that their funds are fully backed on the exchange, while protecting privacy and sensitive platform information.

Insurance Requirements

Establishment of basic insurance standards/strategy, to expand over time. Removing risk to exchange users of any hot wallet theft.


Background and Justifications


Cold Storage Custody/Management
After reviewing close to 100 cases, all thefts tend to break down into more or less the same set of problems:
• Funds stored online or in a smart contract,
• Access controlled by one person or one system,
• 51% attacks (rare),
• Funds sent to the wrong address (also rare), or
• Some combination of the above.
For the first two cases, practical solutions exist and are widely implemented on exchanges already. Offline multi-signature solutions are already industry standard. No cases studied found an external theft or exit scam involving an offline multi-signature wallet implementation. Security can be further improved through minimum numbers of signatories, background checks, providing autonomy and legal protections to each signatory, establishing best practices, and a training/certification program.
The last two transaction risks occur more rarely, and have never resulted in a loss affecting the actual users of the exchange. In all cases to date where operators made the mistake, they've been fully covered by the exchange platforms.
• 51% attacks generally only occur on blockchains with less security. The most prominent cases have been Bitcoin Gold and Ethereum Classic. The simple solution is to enforce deposit limits and block delays such that a 51% attack is not cost-effective.
• The risk of transactions to incorrect addresses can be eliminated by a simple test transaction policy on large transactions. By sending a small amount of funds prior to any large withdrawals/transfers as a standard practice, the accuracy of the wallet address can be validated.
The proposal covers all loss cases and goes beyond, while avoiding significant additional costs, risks, and limitations which may be associated with other frameworks like SOC II.

On The Subject of Third Party Custodians
Many Canadian platforms are currently experimenting with third party custody. From the standpoint of the exchange operator, they can liberate themselves from some responsibility of custody, passing that off to someone else. For regulators, it puts crypto in similar categorization to oil, gold, and other commodities, with some common standards. Platform users would likely feel greater confidence if the custodian was a brand they recognized. If the custodian was knowledgeable and had a decent team that employed multi-sig, they could keep assets safe from internal theft. With the right protections in place, this could be a great solution for many exchanges, particularly those that lack the relevant experience or human resources for their own custody systems.
However, this system is vulnerable to anyone able to impersonate the exchange operators. You may have a situation where different employees who don't know each other that well are interacting between different companies (both the custodian and all their customers which presumably isn't just one exchange). A case study of what can go wrong in this type of environment might be Bitpay, where the CEO was tricked out of 5000 bitcoins over 3 separate payments by a series of emails sent legitimately from a breached computer of another company CEO. It's also still vulnerable to the platform being compromised, as in the really large $70M Bitfinex hack, where the third party Bitgo held one key in a multi-sig wallet. The hacker simply authorized the withdrawal using the same credentials as Bitfinex (requesting Bitgo to sign multiple withdrawal transactions). This succeeded even with the use of multi-sig and two heavily security-focused companies, due to the lack of human oversight (basically, hot wallet). Of course, you can learn from these cases and improve the security, but so can hackers improve their deception and at the end of the day, both of these would have been stopped by the much simpler solution of a qualified team who knew each other and employed multi-sig with properly protected keys. It's pretty hard to beat a human being who knows the business and the typical customer behaviour (or even knows their customers personally) at spotting fraud, and the proposed multi-sig means any hacker has to get through the scrutiny of 3 (or more) separate people, all of whom would have proper training including historical case studies.
There are strong arguments both for and against using use of third party custodians. The proposal sets mandatory minimum custody standards would apply regardless if the cold wallet signatories are exchange operators, independent custodians, or a mix of both.

On The Subject Of Insurance
ShakePay has taken the first steps into this new realm (congratulations). There is no question that crypto users could be better protected by the right insurance policies, and it certainly feels better to transact with insured platforms. The steps required to obtain insurance generally place attention in valuable security areas, and in this case included a review from CipherTrace. One of the key solutions in traditional finance comes from insurance from entities such as the CDIC.
However, historically, there wasn't found any actual insurance payout to any cryptocurrency exchange, and there are notable cases where insurance has not paid. With Bitpay, for example, the insurance agent refused because the issue happened to the third party CEO's computer instead of anything to do with Bitpay itself. With the Youbit exchange in South Korea, their insurance claim was denied, and the exchange ultimately ended up instead going bankrupt with all user's funds lost. To quote Matt Johnson in the original Lloyd's article: “You can create an insurance policy that protects no one – you know there are so many caveats to the policy that it’s not super protective.”
ShakePay's insurance was only reported to cover their cold storage, and “physical theft of the media where the private keys are held”. Physical theft has never, in the history of cryptocurrency exchange cases reviewed, been reported as the cause of loss. From the limited information of the article, ShakePay made it clear their funds are in the hands of a single US custodian, and at least part of their security strategy is to "decline[] to confirm the custodian’s name on the record". While this prevents scrutiny of the custodian, it's pretty silly to speculate that a reasonably competent hacking group couldn't determine who the custodian is. A far more common infiltration strategy historically would be social engineering, which has succeeded repeatedly. A hacker could trick their way into ShakePay's systems and request a fraudulent withdrawal, impersonate ShakePay and request the custodian to move funds, or socially engineer their way into the custodian to initiate the withdrawal of multiple accounts (a payout much larger than ShakePay) exploiting the standard procedures (for example, fraudulently initiating or override the wallet addresses of a real transfer). In each case, nothing was physically stolen and the loss is therefore not covered by insurance.
In order for any insurance to be effective, clear policies have to be established about what needs to be covered. Anything short of that gives Canadians false confidence that they are protected when they aren't in any meaningful way. At this time, the third party insurance market does not appear to provide adequate options or coverage, and effort is necessary to standardize custody standards, which is a likely first step in ultimately setting up an insurance framework.
A better solution compared to third party insurance providers might be for Canadian exchange operators to create their own collective insurance fund, or a specific federal organization similar to the CDIC. Such an organization would have a greater interest or obligation in paying out actual cases, and that would be it's purpose rather than maximizing it's own profit. This would be similar to the SAFU which Binance has launched, except it would cover multiple exchanges. There is little question whether the SAFU would pay out given a breach of Binance, and a similar argument could be made for a insurance fund managed by a collective of exchange operators or a government organization. While a third party insurance provider has the strong market incentive to provide the absolute minimum coverage and no market incentive to payout, an entity managed by exchange operators would have incentive to protect the reputation of exchange operators/the industry, and the government should have the interest of protecting Canadians.

On The Subject of Fractional Reserve
There is a long history of fractional reserve failures, from the first banks in ancient times, through the great depression (where hundreds of fractional reserve banks failed), right through to the 2008 banking collapse referenced in the first bitcoin block. The fractional reserve system allows banks to multiply the money supply far beyond the actual cash (or other assets) in existence, backed only by a system of debt obligations of others. Safely supporting a fractional reserve system is a topic of far greater complexity than can be addressed by a simple policy, and when it comes to cryptocurrency, there is presently no entity reasonably able to bail anyone out in the event of failure. Therefore, this framework is addressed around entities that aim to maintain 100% backing of funds.
There may be some firms that desire but have failed to maintain 100% backing. In this case, there are multiple solutions, including outside investment, merging with other exchanges, or enforcing a gradual restoration plan. All of these solutions are typically far better than shutting down the exchange, and there are multiple cases where they've been used successfully in the past.

Proof of Reserves/Transparency/Accountability
Canadians need to have visibility into the backing on an ongoing basis.
The best solution for crypto-assets is a Proof of Reserve. Such ideas go back all the way to 2013, before even Mt. Gox. However, no Canadian exchange has yet implemented such a system, and only a few international exchanges (CoinFloor in the UK being an example) have. Many firms like Kraken, BitBuy, and now ShakePay use the Proof of Reserve term to refer to lesser proofs which do not actually cryptographically prove the full backing of all user assets on the blockchain. In order for a Proof of Reserve to be effective, it must actually be a complete proof, and it needs to be understood by the public that is expected to use it. Many firms have expressed reservations about the level of transparency required in a complete Proof of Reserve (for example Kraken here). While a complete Proof of Reserves should be encouraged, and there are some solutions in the works (ie TxQuick), this is unlikely to be suitable universally for all exchange operators and users.
Given the limitations, and that firms also manage fiat assets, a more traditional audit process makes more sense. Some Canadian exchanges (CoinSquare, CoinBerry) have already subjected themselves to annual audits. However, these results are not presently shared publicly, and there is no guarantee over the process including all user assets or the integrity and independence of the auditor. The auditor has been typically not known, and in some cases, the identity of the auditor is protected by a NDA. Only in one case (BitBuy) was an actual report generated and publicly shared. There has been no attempt made to validate that user accounts provided during these audits have been complete or accurate. A fraudulent fractional exchange, or one which had suffered a breach they were unwilling to publicly accept (see CoinBene), could easily maintain a second set of books for auditors or simply exclude key accounts to pass an individual audit.
The proposed solution would see a reporting standard which includes at a minimum - percentage of backing for each asset relative to account balances and the nature of how those assets are stored, with ownership proven by the auditor. The auditor would also publicly provide a "hash list", which they independently generate from the accounts provided by the exchange. Every exchange user can then check their information against this public "hash list". A hash is a one-way form of encryption, which fully protects the private information, yet allows anyone who knows that information already to validate that it was included. Less experienced users can take advantage of public tools to calculate the hash from their information (provided by the exchange), and thus have certainty that the auditor received their full balance information. Easy instructions can be provided.
Auditors should be impartial, their identities and process public, and they should be rotated so that the same auditor is never used twice in a row. Balancing the cost of auditing against the needs for regular updates, a 6 month cycle likely makes the most sense.

Hot Wallet Management
The best solution for hot wallets is not to use them. CoinBerry reportedly uses multi-sig on all withdrawals, and Bitmex is an international example known for their structure devoid of hot wallets.
However, many platforms and customers desire fast withdrawal processes, and human validation has a cost of time and delay in this process.
A model of self-insurance or separate funds for hot wallets may be used in these cases. Under this model, a platform still has 100% of their client balance in cold storage and holds additional funds in hot wallets for quick withdrawal. Thus, the risk of those hot wallets is 100% on exchange operators and not affecting the exchange users. Since most platforms typically only have 1%-5% in hot wallets at any given time, it shouldn't be unreasonable to build/maintain these additional reserves over time using exchange fees or additional investment. Larger withdrawals would still be handled at regular intervals from the cold storage.
Hot wallet risks have historically posed a large risk and there is no established standard to guarantee secure hot wallets. When the government of South Korea dispatched security inspections to multiple exchanges, the results were still that 3 of them got hacked after the inspections. If standards develop such that an organization in the market is willing to insure the hot wallets, this could provide an acceptable alternative. Another option may be for multiple exchange operators to pool funds aside for a hot wallet insurance fund. Comprehensive coverage standards must be established and maintained for all hot wallet balances to make sure Canadians are adequately protected.

Current Draft Proposal

(1) Proper multi-signature cold wallet storage.
(a) Each private key is the personal and legal responsibility of one person - the “signatory”. Signatories have special rights and responsibilities to protect user assets. Signatories are trained and certified through a course covering (1) past hacking and fraud cases, (2) proper and secure key generation, and (3) proper safekeeping of private keys. All private keys must be generated and stored 100% offline by the signatory. If even one private keys is ever breached or suspected to be breached, the wallet must be regenerated and all funds relocated to a new wallet.
(b) All signatories must be separate background-checked individuals free of past criminal conviction. Canadians should have a right to know who holds their funds. All signing of transactions must take place with all signatories on Canadian soil or on the soil of a country with a solid legal system which agrees to uphold and support these rules (from an established white-list of countries which expands over time).
(c) 3-5 independent signatures are required for any withdrawal. There must be 1-3 spare signatories, and a maximum of 7 total signatories. The following are all valid combinations: 3of4, 3of5, 3of6, 4of5, 4of6, 4of7, 5of6, or 5of7.
(d) A security audit should be conducted to validate the cold wallet is set up correctly and provide any additional pertinent information. The primary purpose is to ensure that all signatories are acting independently and using best practices for private key storage. A report summarizing all steps taken and who did the audit will be made public. Canadians must be able to validate the right measures are in place to protect their funds.
(e) There is a simple approval process if signatories wish to visit any country outside Canada, with a potential whitelist of exempt countries. At most 2 signatories can be outside of aligned jurisdiction at any given time. All exchanges would be required to keep a compliant cold wallet for Canadian funds and have a Canadian office if they wish to serve Canadian customers.
(2) Regular and transparent solvency audits.
(a) An audit must be conducted at founding, after 3 months of operation, and at least once every 6 months to compare customer balances against all stored cryptocurrency and fiat balances. The auditor must be known, independent, and never the same twice in a row.
(b) An audit report will be published featuring the steps conducted in a readable format. This should be made available to all Canadians on the exchange website and on a government website. The report must include what percentage of each customer asset is backed on the exchange, and how those funds are stored.
(c) The auditor will independently produce a hash of each customer's identifying information and balance as they perform the audit. This will be made publicly available on the exchange and government website, along with simplified instructions that each customer can use to verify that their balance was included in the audit process.
(d) The audit needs to include a proof of ownership for any cryptocurrency wallets included. A satoshi test (spending a small amount) or partially signed transaction both qualify.
(e) Any platform without 100% reserves should be assessed on a regular basis by a government or industry watchdog. This entity should work to prevent any further drop, support any private investor to come in, or facilitate a merger so that 100% backing can be obtained as soon as possible.
(3) Protections for hot wallets and transactions.
(a) A standardized list of approved coins and procedures will be established to constitute valid cold storage wallets. Where a multi-sig process is not natively available, efforts will be undertaken to establish a suitable and stable smart contract standard. This list will be expanded and improved over time. Coins and procedures not on the list are considered hot wallets.
(b) Hot wallets can be backed by additional funds in cold storage or an acceptable third-party insurance provider with a comprehensive coverage policy.
(c) Exchanges are required to cover the full balance of all user funds as denominated in the same currency, or double the balance as denominated in bitcoin or CAD using an established trading rate. If the balance is ever insufficient due to market movements, the firm must rectify this within 24 hours by moving assets to cold storage or increasing insurance coverage.
(d) Any large transactions (above a set threshold) from cold storage to any new wallet addresses (not previously transacted with) must be tested with a smaller transaction first. Deposits of cryptocurrency must be limited to prevent economic 51% attacks. Any issues are to be covered by the exchange.
(e) Exchange platforms must provide suitable authentication for users, including making available approved forms of two-factor authentication. SMS-based authentication is not to be supported. Withdrawals must be blocked for 48 hours in the event of any account password change. Disputes on the negligence of exchanges should be governed by case law.

Steps Forward

Continued review of existing OSC feedback is still underway. More feedback and opinions on the framework and ideas as presented here are extremely valuable. The above is a draft and not finalized.
The process of further developing and bringing a suitable framework to protect Canadians will require the support of exchange operators, legal experts, and many others in the community. The costs of not doing such are tremendous. A large and convoluted framework, one based on flawed ideas or implementation, or one which fails to properly safeguard Canadians is not just extremely expensive and risky for all Canadians, severely limiting to the credibility and reputation of the industry, but an existential risk to many exchanges.
The responsibility falls to all of us to provide our insight and make our opinions heard on this critical matter. Please take the time to give your thoughts.
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

ExtStock exchange is doing a live exit scam right now

ExtStock exchange is doing a live exit scam right now
Hello,
I got contacted by a friend that deposited money to the unknown exchange "ExtStock" He saw that exchange on Coinmarketcap and others website, pretending having best volume and liquidity.
ExtStock is announing fake volume, and Bitcoin price is 500-600$ higher than others platform.
The situation is that since some weeks, every users has theirs funds locked in the exchange. The support is talking about a "suspect activity", then no answer. They are just buying time.
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5238319.0 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=3049906.msg54360039#msg54360039
I suspect them running a fractional reserve, probably because of a hack, an exit scam, or a bad investment with their customers funds?
But the fact is that they have locked funds and are still tweeting like if everything is normal.
I twitted about the situation to warm users about the exchange: https://twitter.com/anth0mk/status/1255923160643403776 but ExtStock blocked me.

I contacted some projects and platform to stop them supporting Extstock, like the LISK project.

https://preview.redd.it/60icjv4vmrw41.png?width=597&format=png&auto=webp&s=4f6b3fd09341cc0e267782711aed2f8d596a305d

The compagny behind Extstock is "EXCHANGE CLOUD LIMITED" a dormant UK compagny with 1$ as assets
https://preview.redd.it/cmqvo5zbnrw41.png?width=727&format=png&auto=webp&s=23fac0bf66a85acf23260cc218469baef149014f


Please, beware of platforms listed on Coinmarketcap, and others website: a lot of website are paid to list ExtStock between Kraken, coinbase and binance...
submitted by spartanz51 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Binance vs Gemini [US]

[ 🔴 DELETED 🔴 ] Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by nut__sackington [link]
Hey all,
I've closed my account with Coinbase because, well, they suck. I made a Kraken account but found that their ACH partner Etana Custody is extremely invasive with personal information. Now I've narrowed down to Binance and Gemini for where I will buy crypto from. How do these compare to each other?
My main concerns are privacy--I'm fine giving my state ID and everything, but some of the privacy agreements look real sketchy these days, saying things like "...and any other means of tracking, potentially using 3rd party services" (obviously not verbatim lol, but vague statements like that which leave a lot of room for data collection).
I don't mind waiting a few days to be able to purchase and send coin after an ACH deposit.. but I'd like it faster than the entire week that Coinbase makes you wait.
How do you all weigh these pros and cons when deciding where to buy/trade? Any thoughts on how Gemini and Binance compare for US residents?
Edit:
If anyone uses these markets, how much of a hassle was it to successfully on-ramp fiat with ACH? Extra verifications/applications/etc. ?
nut__sackington your post has been copied because one or more comments have been removed by a moderator. This copy will preserve unmoderated topic. If you would like to opt-out, please PM me.
submitted by anticensor_bot to u/anticensor_bot [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Futures Trading Platforms - Comparsion of Trading Fees

As i'm the perfect example of a scalper, low risk and small positions, i wanted to find out if and how much the fees would eat up my profit.
What kind of fees are applied on Trading Platforms?
Maker fees are paid when you add liquidity to our order book by placing a limit order below the ticker price for buy, and above the ticker price for sell.
Taker fees are paid when you remove liquidity from our order book by placing any order that is executed against an order on the order book.
Of course there are deposit/withdrawal fees on some platforms, but these are easy to calculate and foreseeable.

List of Trading Platforms and it's fees (A to Z)
All the fees are applied to BTC/USD Futures (Perpetual Contracts).
Binance – MF 0.02% / TF 0.04% Bitmex – MF -0.025% / TF 0.075% Bybit – MF -0.025% / TF 0.075% Deribit – MF -0.025% / TF 0.075% Digitex Futures – MF 0.00% / TF 0.00% Huobi Global – MF 0.02% / TF 0.04% Kraken – MF -0.02% / TF 0.075% OKEx – MF 0.02% / TF 0.05% Phemex – MF -0.025% / TF 0.075%
MF = Maker Fees / TF = Taker Fees
You see on some exchange you have a negative maker fee, this is because you get rewarded for adding liquidity.

Let's calculate our profitability
So let's say we enter a trade and buy 2 Bitcoins at $10500, the price rises to $10505 after a few minutes and we hop out of the trade. How much did we effectively made?
Let's compare the worst case and best case scenarios.
Worst case (OKEx) MF (2×10500 = 21000) => (21000 / 100) × 0.02 = $4.20 fees for placing your order TF (2×10505 = 21010) => (21010 / 100) × 0.05 = $10.50 fees for selling your position Net profit = $10 - $14.70 = -$4.70
Best case (Digitex Futures) MF (2x10500 = 21000) => (21000 / 100) × 0.00 = $0.00 fees for placing your order TF (2×10505 = 21010) => (21010 / 100) × 0.00 = $0.00 fees for selling your position Net profit = $10 -$0.00 = +$10.00

Conclusion
As you can see, scalping on almost all platforms is impossible unless you go for higher risk or longer term trades. The fees just make it impossible to make quick profits unless you are on the right platform.
submitted by Fourkane to Digitex_Official [link] [comments]

What Is a Cryptocurrency Exchange?

What Is a Cryptocurrency Exchange?

https://preview.redd.it/1v6z6af9jcf51.png?width=963&format=png&auto=webp&s=5b29763a9609c95dc0941c1a9edc443b2e3c1127
A cryptocurrency exchange is the meeting point where traders exchange their cryptocurrencies for fiat money or other cryptos. These online exchanges, where the market price is generated, mark the value of cryptocurrencies based on supply and demand. It is a virtual space that allows the purchase and sale of cryptocurrencies.
Since the appearance of Bitcoin in January 2009, cryptocurrencies have quickly demanded the use of this type of platform to access decentralized assets. The first cryptocurrency exchange was developed in March 2010 under the name of Bitcoinmarket. Since then, many proposals have emerged in the crypto space to provide quality options to cryptocurrency traders worldwide.
Listing
One of the important achievements of a Blockchain platform is getting your currency listed on a major cryptocurrency exchange in the digital finance arena.
According to the Cambridge Dictionary, in the stock market, the term ‘listing’ refers to a place in a list of companies whose shares are bought and sold on a particular stock market, or the act of putting a company on a list. In the case of cryptocurrencies, the native tokens or coins of a blockchain platform represent those ‘shares’ of the platform.
However, being listed on exchanges, especially on major ones, is neither easy nor straightforward. Many cryptocurrency exchanges have well-defined listing criteria to list the cryptocurrencies of credible projects, and not all projects meet the criteria the exchanges present.
How exchanges operate
Cryptocurrency exchanges can be classified into different types, but they all share something in common. They are all platforms designed to facilitate the participation of their users in the alternative cryptocurrency market.
For this, they have fundamental and technical analysis tools and a large number of indicators so that traders can make the best decisions at all times within the market.
Depending on the type of exchange used, transactions work on the platform or user side, all based on the benefits offered by blockchain technology.
Most of the exchanges charge a commission on the buy-sell operation established by the trader. Also, those transactions are confirmed in the native blockchain of currency on which it is operated. Thus, for example, if you deposit or withdraw a certain amount of BTC in Binance, you will have to wait for the confirmation of the bitcoin blockchain network. You can see the corresponding balance successfully reflected after your transaction is confirmed.
What is the difference between a CEX and DEX
As we mentioned earlier, there are many categories of cryptocurrency exchanges, but fundamentally two large groups dominate the scene: centralized «CEX» and decentralized «DEX» exchanges.
The first group corresponds to traditional exchanges, where access to buy or sell their tokens according to the market price.
Compared to DEX, they are highly regulated platforms that must meet KYC(Know Your Customer) and AML(Anti money laundering) standards. It means that there is no privacy on their platforms since users are forced to reveal their identity to trade. Coinbase, Binance, Kraken, Bithumb, and Bitfinex are examples of this type of exchange.
Moreover, CEX charges for its services, and some of them offer funding alternatives through traditional bank accounts or conventional credit cards. By charging commissions, CEX keeps the platform functioning and generating income.
In the case of decentralized exchanges or DEX, they are a direct evolution of the traditional ones. Although they work in a similar way to the CEX, they are able to operate in a decentralized way thanks to smart contracts. It indicates that there are no intermediaries, and the platform is self-supporting due to its programming. In addition to this, DEX usually has high levels of privacy and even anonymity since it does not require KYC or AML. Some of the examples of DEX are AirSwap, Bancor, UniSwap, and Bisq.
However, despite its mentioned qualities, there are defects that traders are reluctant to use DEX exchange. In many cases, its interface is difficult to use for the average trader to operate, and it has limited order types. Also, its low liquidity that generates high spreads drives away the users.
Where FLETA is listed
In the case of the FLETA token, we can find it available in a large number of exchanges globally.
Since our first listing on the GDAC Exchange with the FLETA / KRW pair, the token is now available on five more exchanges for a total of enlistment in 08 pairs within six global exchanges.
Below you can find the complete list of token availability in cryptocurrency exchanges in the market:
● Bithumb «FLETA / KRW»
● Coinone «FLETA / KRW»
● Bithumb Global «FLETA / USDT»
● Bittrex «FLETA / BTC»
● DigiFinex «FLETA / ETH»
● DigiFinex «FLETA / BTC»
● GDAC «FLETA / KRW»
● Bitsonic «FLETA / KRW»
**
submitted by fleta-official to fletachain [link] [comments]

Crypto Banking Wars: Will Coinbase or Binance Become The Bank of The Future?

Crypto Banking Wars: Will Coinbase or Binance Become The Bank of The Future?
Can the early success of major crypto exchanges propel them to winning the broader consumer finance market?
https://reddit.com/link/i48t4q/video/v4eo10gom7f51/player
This is the first part of Crypto Banking Wars — a new series that examines what crypto-native company is most likely to become the bank of the future. Who is best positioned to reach mainstream adoption in consumer finance?
While crypto allows the world to get rid of banks, a bank will still very much be necessary for this powerful technology to reach the masses. We believe a crypto-native company, like Genesis Block, will become the bank of the future.
In an earlier series, Crypto-Powered, we laid out arguments for why crypto-native companies have a huge edge in the market. When you consider both the broad spectrum of financial use-cases and the enormous value unlocked through these DeFi protocols, you can see just how big of an unfair advantage blockchain tech becomes for companies who truly understand and leverage it. Traditional banks and fintech unicorns simply won’t be able to keep up.
The power players of consumer finance in the 21st century will be crypto-native companies who build with blockchain technology at their core.
The crypto landscape is still nascent. We’re still very much in the fragmented, unbundled phase of the industry lifecycle. Beyond what Genesis Block is doing, there are signs of other companies slowly starting to bundle financial services into what could be an all-in-one bank replacement.
So the key question that this series hopes to answer:
Which crypto-native company will successfully become the bank of the future?
We obviously think Genesis Block is well-positioned to win. But we certainly aren’t the only game in town. In this series, we’ll be doing an analysis of who is most capable of thwarting our efforts. We’ll look at categories like crypto exchanges, crypto wallets, centralized lending & borrowing services, and crypto debit card companies. Each category will have its own dedicated post.
Today we’re analyzing big crypto exchanges. The two companies we’ll focus on today are Coinbase (biggest American exchange) and Binance (biggest global exchange). They are the top two exchanges in terms of Bitcoin trading volume. They are in pole position to winning this market — they have a huge existing userbase and strong financial resources.
Will Coinbase or Binance become the bank of the future? Can their early success propel them to winning the broader consumer finance market? Is their growth too far ahead for anyone else to catch up? Let’s dive in.
https://preview.redd.it/lau4hevpm7f51.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=2c5de1ba497199f36aa194e5809bd86e5ab533d8

Binance

The most formidable exchange on the global stage is Binance (Crunchbase). All signs suggest they have significantly more users and a stronger balance sheet than Coinbase. No other exchange is executing as aggressively and relentlessly as Binance is. The cadence at which they are shipping and launching new products is nothing short of impressive. As Tushar Jain from Multicoin argues, Binance is Blitzscaling.
Here are some of the products that they’ve launched in the last 18 months. Only a few are announced but still pre-launch.
Binance is well-positioned to become the crypto-powered, all-in-one, bundled solution for financial services. They already have so many of the pieces. But the key question is:
Can they create a cohesive & united product experience?

Binance Weaknesses

Binance is strong, but they do have a few major weaknesses that could slow them down.
  1. Traders & Speculators Binance is currently very geared for speculators, traders, and financial professionals. Their bread-and-butter is trading (spot, margin, options, futures). Their UI is littered with depth charts, order books, candlesticks, and other financial concepts that are beyond the reach of most normal consumers. Their product today is not at all tailored for the broader consumer market. Given Binance’s popularity and strength among the pro audience, it’s unlikely that they will dumb down or simplify their product any time soon. That would jeopardize their core business. Binance will likely need an entirely new product/brand to go beyond the pro user crowd. That will take time (or an acquisition). So the question remains, is Binance even interested in the broader consumer market? Or will they continue to focus on their core product, the one-stop-shop for pro crypto traders?
  2. Controversies & Hot Water Binance has had a number of controversies. No one seems to know where they are based — so what regulatory agencies can hold them accountable? Last year, some sensitive, private user data got leaked. When they announced their debit card program, they had to remove mentions of Visa quickly after. And though the “police raid” story proved to be untrue, there are still a lot of questions about what happened with their Shanghai office shut down (where there is smoke, there is fire). If any company has had a “move fast and break things” attitude, it is Binance. That attitude has served them well so far but as they try to do business in more regulated countries like America, this will make their road much more difficult — especially in the consumer market where trust takes a long time to earn, but can be destroyed in an instant. This is perhaps why the Binance US product is an empty shell when compared to their main global product.
  3. Disjointed Product Experience Because Binance has so many different teams launching so many different services, their core product is increasingly feeling disjointed and disconnected. Many of the new features are sloppily integrated with each other. There’s no cohesive product experience. This is one of the downsides of executing and shipping at their relentless pace. For example, users don’t have a single wallet that shows their balances. Depending on if the user wants to do spot trading, margin, futures, or savings… the user needs to constantly be transferring their assets from one wallet to another. It’s not a unified, frictionless, simple user experience. This is one major downside of the “move fast and break things” approach.
  4. BNB token Binance raised $15M in a 2017 ICO by selling their $BNB token. The current market cap of $BNB is worth more than $2.6B. Financially this token has served them well. However, given how BNB works (for example, their token burn), there are a lot of open questions as to how BNB will be treated with US security laws. Their Binance US product so far is treading very lightly with its use of BNB. Their token could become a liability for Binance as it enters more regulated markets. Whether the crypto community likes it or not, until regulators get caught up and understand the power of decentralized technology, tokens will still be a regulatory burden — especially for anything that touches consumers.
  5. Binance Chain & Smart Contract Platform Binance is launching its own smart contract platform soon. Based on compatibility choices, they have their sights aimed at the Ethereum developer community. It’s unclear how easy it’ll be to convince developers to move to Binance chain. Most of the current developer energy and momentum around smart contracts is with Ethereum. Because Binance now has their own horse in the race, it’s unlikely they will ever decide to leverage Ethereum’s DeFi protocols. This could likely be a major strategic mistake — and hubris that goes a step too far. Binance will be pushing and promoting protocols on their own platform. The major risk of being all-in on their own platform is that they miss having a seat on the Ethereum rocket ship — specifically the growth of DeFi use-cases and the enormous value that can be unlocked. Integrating with Ethereum’s protocols would be either admitting defeat of their own platform or competing directly against themselves.

Binance Wrap Up

I don’t believe Binance is likely to succeed with a homegrown product aimed at the consumer finance market. Their current product — which is focused heavily on professional traders and speculators — is unlikely to become the bank of the future. If they wanted to enter the broader consumer market, I believe it’s much more likely that they will acquire a company that is getting early traction. They are not afraid to make acquisitions (Trust, JEX, WazirX, DappReview, BxB, CoinMarketCap, Swipe).
However, never count CZ out. He is a hustler. Binance is executing so aggressively and relentlessly that they will always be on the shortlist of major contenders.
https://preview.redd.it/mxmlg1zqm7f51.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=2d900dd5ff7f3b00df5fe5a48305d57ebeffaa9a

Coinbase

The crypto-native company that I believe is more likely to become the bank of the future is Coinbase (crunchbase). Their dominance in America could serve as a springboard to winning the West (Binance has a stronger foothold in Asia). Coinbase has more than 30M users. Their exchange business is a money-printing machine. They have a solid reputation as it relates to compliance and working with regulators. Their CEO is a longtime member of the crypto community. They are rumored to be going public soon.

Coinbase Strengths

Let’s look at what makes them strong and a likely contender for winning the broader consumer finance market.
  1. Different Audience, Different Experience Coinbase has been smart to create a unique product experience for each audience — the pro speculator crowd and the common retail user. Their simple consumer version is at Coinbase.com. That’s the default. Their product for the more sophisticated traders and speculators is at Coinbase Pro (formerly GDAX). Unlike Binance, Coinbase can slowly build out the bank of the future for the broad consumer market while still having a home for their hardcore crypto traders. They aren’t afraid to have different experiences for different audiences.
  2. Brand & Design Coinbase has a strong product design team. Their brand is capable of going beyond the male-dominated crypto audience. Their product is clean and simple — much more consumer-friendly than Binance. It’s clear they spend a lot of time thinking about their user experience. Interacting directly with crypto can sometimes be rough and raw (especially for n00bs). When I was at Mainframe we hosted a panel about Crypto UX challenges at the DevCon4 Dapp Awards. Connie Yang (Head of Design at Coinbase) was on the panel. She was impressive. Some of their design philosophies will bode well as they push to reach the broader consumer finance market.
  3. USDC Stablecoin Coinbase (along with Circle) launched USDC. We’ve shared some stats about its impressive growth when we discussed DeFi use-cases. USDC is quickly becoming integrated with most DeFi protocols. As a result, Coinbase is getting a front-row seat at some of the most exciting things happening in decentralized finance. As Coinbase builds its knowledge and networks around these protocols, it could put them in a favorable position to unlock incredible value for their users.
  4. Early Signs of Bundling Though Coinbase has nowhere near as many products & services as Binance, they are slowly starting to add more financial services that may appeal to the broader market. They are now letting depositors earn interest on USDC (also DAI & Tezos). In the UK they are piloting a debit card. Users can now invest in crypto with dollar-cost-averaging. It’s not much, but it’s a start. You can start to see hints of a more bundled solution around financial services.

Coinbase Weaknesses

Let’s now look at some things that could hold them back.
  1. Slow Cadence In the fast-paced world of crypto, and especially when compared to Binance, Coinbase does not ship very many new products very often. This is perhaps their greatest weakness. Smaller, more nimble startups may run circles around them. They were smart to launch Coinbase Ventures where tey invest in early-stage startups. They can now keep an ear to the ground on innovation. Perhaps their cadence is normal for a company of their size — but the Binance pace creates quite the contrast.
  2. Lack of Innovation When you consider the previous point (slow cadence), it’s unclear if Coinbase is capable of building and launching new products that are built internally. Most of their new products have come through acquisitions. Their Earn.com acquisition is what led to their Earn educational product. Their acquisition of Xapo helped bolster their institutional custody offering. They acqui-hired a team to help launch their staking infrastructure. Their acquisition of Cipher Browser became an important part of Coinbase Wallet. And recently, they acquired Tagomi — a crypto prime brokerage. Perhaps most of Coinbase’s team is just focused on improving their golden goose, their exchange business. It’s unclear. But the jury is still out on if they can successfully innovate internally and launch any homegrown products.
  3. Talent Exodus There have been numerous reports of executive turmoil at Coinbase. It raises a lot of questions about company culture and vision. Some of the executives who departed include COO Asiff Hirji, CTO Balaji Srinivasan, VP & GM Adam White, VP Eng Tim Wagner, VP Product Jeremy Henrickson, Sr Dir of Eng Namrata Ganatra, VP of Intl Biz Dan Romero, Dir of Inst Sales Christine Sandler, Head of Trading Hunter Merghart, Dir Data Science Soups Ranjan, Policy Lead Mike Lempres, Sr Compliance Vaishali Mehta. Many of these folks didn’t stay with Coinbase very long. We don’t know exactly why it’s happening —but when you consider a few of my first points (slow cadence, lack of innovation), you have to wonder if it’s all related.
  4. Institutional Focus As a company, we are a Coinbase client. We love their institutional offering. It’s clear they’ve been investing a lot in this area. A recent Coinbase blog post made it clear that this has been a focus: “Over the past 12 months, Coinbase has been laser-focused on building out the types of features and services that our institutional customers need.” Their Tagomi acquisition only re-enforced this focus. Perhaps this is why their consumer product has felt so neglected. They’ve been heavily investing in their institutional services since May 2018. For a company that’s getting very close to an IPO, it makes sense that they’d focus on areas that present strong revenue opportunities — as they do with institutional clients. Even for big companies like Coinbase, it’s hard to have a split focus. If they are “laser-focused” on the institutional audience, it’s unlikely they’ll be launching any major consumer products anytime soon.

Coinbase Wrap Up

At Genesis Block, we‘re proud to be working with Coinbase. They are a fantastic company. However, I don’t believe that they’ll succeed in building their own product for the broader consumer finance market. While they have incredible design, there are no signs that they are focused on or capable of internally building this type of product.
Similar to Binance, I think it’s far more likely that Coinbase acquires a promising young startup with strong growth.

Honorable Mentions

Other US-based exchanges worth mentioning are Kraken, Gemini, and Bittrex. So far we’ve seen very few signs that any of them will aggressively attack broader consumer finance. Most are going in the way of Binance — listing more assets and adding more pro tools like margin and futures trading. And many, like Coinbase, are trying to attract more institutional customers. For example, Gemini with their custody product.

Wrap Up

Coinbase and Binance have huge war chests and massive reach. For that alone, they should always be considered threats to Genesis Block. However, their products are very, very different than the product we’re building. And their approach is very different as well. They are trying to educate and onboard people into crypto. At Genesis Block, we believe the masses shouldn’t need to know or care about it. We did an entire series about this, Spreading Crypto.
Most everyone needs banking — whether it be to borrow, spend, invest, earn interest, etc. Not everyone needs a crypto exchange. For non-crypto consumers (the mass market), the differences between a bank and a crypto exchange are immense. Companies like Binance and Coinbase make a lot of money on their crypto exchange business. It would be really difficult, gutsy, and risky for any of them to completely change their narrative, messaging, and product to focus on the broader consumer market. I don’t believe they would ever risk biting the hand that feeds them.
In summary, as it relates to a digital bank aimed at the mass market, I believe both Coinbase and Binance are much more likely to acquire a startup in this space than they are to build it themselves. And I think they would want to keep the brand/product distinct and separate from their core crypto exchange business.
So back to the original question, is Coinbase and Binance a threat to Genesis Block? Not really. Not today. But they could be, and for that, we want to stay close to them.
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How do I Buy Bitcoin & Crypto? - Pros & Cons of 5 Exchanges

Are you looking to start investing in cryptocurrency and wondering the best place to buy it? Or if you are in the US, are you wondering which crypto exchanges are legal for you to use? Below is a list of 5 cryptocurrency exchanges that, as of this post, are all legal for US citizens. I have also included a quick break down on the pros and cons of each exchange. This is not a complete list of every exchange available to US citizens as there are others, but these are my own personal top 5 based on characteristics such as ease of use, security, fees, liquidity and selection of available coins to trade. If you are not located in the US there is a good chance most of these exchanges are available to you as well, you will just need to check with the exchange and look up your own country's policies regarding the purchase of cryptocurrencies.
As you go through the list please keep in mind, while I do have them ranked 1 through 5, there is not a lot separating them and each of these exchanges offer something a little unique from the others. Everyone's investment goals and preferences are going to be a little different so my #5 exchange here could be your #1 based on your criteria. It is also pretty likely that if you end up wanting to invest in 5 or more coins at some point, no one exchange is going to have all of them available so you will likely need to open multiple accounts anyways. Okay, on to the list.

1) Binance US
Binance US is an offshoot of one of the largest cryptocurrency exchanges out there, Binance.com. They created Binance US in response to US citizens being banned from using their main exchange back in 2019. These two exchanges function much the same with the biggest difference being that Binance US has a slightly smaller pool of cryptos listed on their exchange, which currently is a little over 30 coins. Other than that, all of the great features of Binance.com that have helped it become one of the largest crypto exchanges in the world, apply to Binance US as well.
PROS
- Low Fees: Start at 0.10% spot trading fee and goes down from there depending on your trading frequency. You can also save an additional 25% off your trading fees by holding their native token BNB.
- High Trading Volume: Allows you to get in and out of your positions more easily.
- Coin Selection: Currently as of this writing there are over 30 different coins available to be traded.
- Reliability / Reputation: As one of the larger players in the crypto space, Binance is able to offer a bit of security as they are able to throw a lot of money at any potential problems with things like hackers. Binance US puts away a set portion of their earnings every month in a fund that acts as insurance against any funds that may be lost due to hackers. Back in 2019 they had an incident where 40 million dollars of crypto was stolen by hackers and they reimbursed every penny to their customers.
CONS
- Interface: Trading can be a little confusing for those not used to trading cryptocurrencies. While it is not too difficult to learn, a couple of the upcoming exchanges on my list are a little more user friendly for those who are new to the space.
All things considered, right now if I was getting started with Crypto trading in the US, Binance US would be the first account that I created. If you would like to open an account you can use the link below. If you are located outside of the United States I would suggest opening an account on the the original Binance.com exchange as they currently have a wider selection of cryptos to pick from. Below is a link for their sign up as well if you are interested.
Binance US Sign Up
Binance Sign Up (Non-US Citizens)

2) Crypto.com
Crypto.com is on a mission to be the leader in cryptocurrency adoption to the masses and is trying to bridge the gap between the worlds of blockchain and traditional finance. Along with trading cryptocurrencies they have programs on their app like Earn, Invest, Pay & Credit which you would find with more traditional finance companies. For instance, through their Earn program there are many coins you can earn interest on by locking them up for a set time period. Depending on the coin, how many MCO (Crypto.com native coin) you have staked and how long you keep your tokens locked up for, you can earn anywhere from 2% to 18% interest which a lot better than any bank is going to do for you these days.
One of the best features of Crypto.com, in my opinion, are their great eye-catching, metal crypto MCO reward credit cards. These cards pay you cashback, in the form of their MCO token, for all of your day to day purchases anywhere that VISA is accepted. Depending on which level of card you get, these credit cards reward 1% to 5% cashback on all spending along with other great benefits like free ATM & international withdrawals, 100% cashback on Spotify & Netflix subscriptions and airport lounge access. In order to get your hands on one of these cards you will need to open a Crypto.com account if you don’t already have one. There is good news if you don’t already have one, as new sign ups can get $50 worth of MCO tokens free by using the link and promo code I have posted below. Please note that the $50 of MCO tokens will remain locked until you deposit & stake at least 50 MCO tokens toward the sign up of the particular card you are interested in. If you want to know a little more about these cards you can check out method #3 in my earlier post 5 Easy Legitimate Ways to Earn Free Crypto where I go into a bit more detail on them. However, for the purpose of this post, let's get to some pros and cons of their exchange platform.
PROS
- Low Fees: Start at 0.20% and go lower from there depending on your trading volume.
- Coin Selection: Currently as of this writing there are 53 different coins available to be traded.
- Interface: Easy to use app that is very user friendly.- Customer Service: One of the best customer service programs in the industry if you need any help.
CONS
- App Only: No desktop version, all functions on the exchange must be done via their app.
- History: Founded in 2016 so they are still relatively new to the industry.
Crypto.com is a great option if you are looking to trade cryptocurrencies and also want to take advantage of things like their cash back VISA cards and Earn program that pay you great interest rates as you hold your coins. Below is a link you can use to sign up for a new account. If you are also interested in getting one of their MCO Visa cards, use the link below along with the promo code to get $50 of their MCO token free.
Crypto.com Sign Up
PROMO CODE: gapena3dq4

3) Coinbase Headquartered in San Francisco, Coinbase is the largest US-based crypto exchange with about 20 million current users. Like Crypto.com, they are trying to bring cryptocurrency trading to the masses through an easy to use interface and education. One way they try to educate their users is through their Coinbase Earn program where they offer free crypto for watching short educational videos teaching you about the various coins they offer on their exchange. I will not go into the details of that program here, but if you are interested in checking it out I go into a bit more detail on it in my post 5 Easy Legitimate Ways to Earn Free Crypto. Now on to some of the pros and cons.
PROS
- High Trading Volume: Allows you to get in and out of your positions easily.
- Interface: Easy to use desktop interface and trading mechanisms for those new to crypto trading.
- Insurance: Coinbase carries an insurance policy that covers 2% of all assets on the exchange and they keep the other 98% in cold storage.
CONS
- Fees: While their fee structure is not horrible, it is a bit higher than Crypto.com and Binance US. Crypto to crypto trading fees are at 0.50% / bank purchases at 1.49% / credit & debit card purchases at 3.99%.
- Coin Selection: Currently they only have about 20 coins to choose from, however they are looking to add a bunch more soon.
Coinbase is a solid choice for anyone looking to get started in crypto trading. If you would like to open an account you can use the link below which will get you $10 of free Bitcoin as a sign up bonus. Please note that to get the free $10 you must buy or sell $100 worth of crypto within 180 days of signing up.
Coinbase Sign Up

4) Robinhood
Robinhood is the pioneer of no fee trading for securities which is the main benefit of this exchange. It also is, to my knowledge, one of the few exchanges that allow you to trade both traditional stocks and cryptocurrencies. Technically their stock and crypto exchanges are separate entities, however you can seamlessly trade them both from the same account on their app. This is great for those who would like to get started trading in both crypto and traditional stocks but don't want to open multiple accounts. Or for those who might want to trade back and forth between stocks and crypto but don't want to have to transfer money between accounts to do so. Now to explore some other features of the Robinhood exchange let's get into the pros and cons.

PROS
- Fees: None (FREE!)
- Flexibility: Can trade multiple asset classes (Stocks, Crypto, ETFs, Options)
- Interface: Easy to use app that is very user friendly. Desktop version available as well.

CONS
- Coin Selection: Currently only offer 7 coins that can be traded (BTC, BCH, BSV, DOGE, ETH, ETC, LTC)
- Coin Mobility: Your coins must remain on the Robinhood exchange. You cannot transfer your coins to another exchange or withdraw them to put in your own digital wallets.
With their user friendly interface and no fees, Robinhood is very appealing for those just getting into crypto trading. If you are just looking to buy some of the higher cap coins like Bitcoin and Etherium, this exchange can be a good fit for you. However if you know there are some projects you would like to invest in that are not listed above, you may want to choose some of the other exchanges on this list, or both. If you are unsure at this point if you want to invest beyond coins like Bitcoin and Etherium in the future, it doesn't hurt to start here, get your feet wet and open another account down the road if you have other projects you get interested in. If you would like to open an account you can use the link below to get one free stock with sign up! This free stock will be valued somewhere between $2.50 and $200.
Robinhood Sign Up

5) Kraken
Kraken exchange is based out of the United States and was founded back in 2011. While there is no specific trait that blows away the competition with this exchange, it does most everything pretty well. Like most crypto exchanges at this point, your funds on there are not FDIC insured, however Kraken does keep a separate fund that serves as an insurance policy and is currently over 100 million dollars. They also show great transparency and compliance with programs like their Proof of Reserves which offers proof that they hold all of the funds that they say they do. Here is quick break down of their pros and cons.

PROS
- Low Fees: Range from 0.10% to 0.26% depending on your trading frequency.
- High Security: One of the best reputations in the industry for security.
- Coin Selection: Good but not great. Currently they have about 20 coins available for trading.

CONS
- Interface: Making trades can be a little confusing for beginners who are not familiar with their format. However with a couple quick tutorials most of you should be able to get familiar with it pretty quickly.
To open an account and begin trading with Kraken use the link below.
Kraken Sign Up

Interested in some ways you can passively earn free crypto?

Below is a link to a previous post that shares my best ways to earn free crypto in 2020 with the least amount of effort.
5 Easy Legitimate Ways to Earn Free Crypto
submitted by CaliBum16 to Crypto_General [link] [comments]

How to deposit and withdraw on Binance - YouTube Kraken Exchange Tutorial - How to Reduce Bitcoin Transaction Fees ASL Crypto Tips: How to withdraw XRP on Kraken to Binance or Others How to Deposit and Withdraw on Binance  Binance Margin Trading  Full Tutorial For Beginners

Binance does not provide information on the minimum deposit amount. As we cover mostly forex brokers, we are used to companies stating this information openly. The need for a minimum deposit level is associated with the legal costs of opening an account, which may exceed the potential commissions you will make with a broker, if you are trading too small. That being said several companies don ... Bitcoin from Binance to Kraken. Step by step overview on how to withdraw Bitcoin from Binance. Withdrawing Bitcoin from your Binance account is very straight-forward. After making sure that your Binance account is safe to use and is fully verified, you can proceed with performing deposit and withdrawal transactions. Here, you will find steps that you can follow in withdrawing Bitcoin from your ... Step by step overview on how to withdraw Bitcoin from Kraken. The withdrawal process on Kraken is simple and the steps are easy to follow. You are required to comply with the Account Verification process and Two-factor Authentication prior to doing any transaction, like Bitcoin withdrawal. Here are the steps on how to withdraw Bitcoin from your registered and confirmed Kraken account: Withdraw Kraken proudly calls itself one of the oldest Bitcoin exchanges in the world. They were founded in 2011 by Jesse Powell, but they formally launched and went live in 2013.. Today it, of course, is more than just a Bitcoin exchange. They have currently today 32 cryptocurrencies available for trade on their platform and add to that six fiat-to-crypto trading pairs (USD, EUR, CAD, JPY, GBP, and CHF). Kraken is more than just a Bitcoin trading platform. Come see why our cryptocurrency exchange is the best place to buy, sell, trade and learn about crypto. New! Fund and Trade SNX, BAL, KSM and CRV. Learn more. Important: Trading and Staking for Polkadot is now live. DOT tokens are re-denominated 100:1 (New DOT). Learn more. New! Fund and Trade Augur (REPv2). Learn more. New! Fund and Trade ... For example, on the Bitcoin blockchain, a block is mined on average every 10 minutes, and Kraken only credits Bitcoin deposits to a client’s account after 6 confirmations, which takes approximately 60 minutes. However, sometimes it can take Bitcoin miners 30 or even 60 minutes to mine a single block (1 confirmation). This is outside of Kraken ... Kraken vs Binance are two competent exchanges you can choose from and they both cater to a unique client. Let’s dig deeper to analyse and compare the quality of services both exchanges offer. Exchanges overview. Kraken is a crypto-crypto as well as fiat-to-crypto exchange that is considered one of the top crypto exchanges in the world. The exchange was launched in 2011 and is based in San ...

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How to deposit and withdraw on Binance - YouTube

★★ Get DISCOUNTS On Your Binance Fees! ★★ Affiliate Fee Kickback for Binance exchange and more ★ ★ BINANCE - You can get 10% off on your fees by using our Binance Affiliate link below ... IN today's video we take a look at how to Use Binance , specifically, how to deposit and withdraw on the Binance Exchange. I've set up a new Telegram group f... Kraken Bitcoin Exchange Tutorial. In this video, I show you how to buy your first Bitcoin using the Kraken exchange. I also walk you through how to deposit and withdraw your funds. Bitcoin for Beginners 10,038 views 15:15 What It Was Like MINING Cryptocurrency Full-Time For A Year Tails Health Update VoskCoin Rebrand - Duration: 23:44.

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